Origin 890 Jump - Luxury Touring Ship

 

Transcript of Casual Citizen Episode 27 which covered the Origin 890 Jump

You can view the video version here on my YouTube channel.

Hello Star Citizen ‘Verse, I’m back and welcome to another episode of Casual Citizen. An ongoing series about the upcoming first person MMO, Star Citizen, by Cloud Imperium Games. I’m your host Alysianah from ALYSIANAHSWORLD.COM.  It’s been almost 3 months since my last show. I needed to take time off for real life changes.  All good things and exciting things, but extremely time-consuming. But I’m back and excited to dive into what’s happening in the world of Star Citizen.

This week it’s a ship show, the topic I enjoy most next to lore. We’re taking a look at the Origin 890 Jump, most recent ship and final ship added to my fleet. Covering this ship has been on my list of things to do for a while so let’s get at it.

Please sit back, relax and enjoy.

BEGIN TRANSMISSION.

Let’s begin our journey with a look at the 890 J’s manufacturer, Origin Jumpworks.

 

Directly from CIG…

If it is possible for a company to merge class and sophistication with the sheer risk of spaceflight and the cold-blooded nature of interstellar dogfighting, ORIGIN Jumpworks comes the closest. The company’s extensive array of high-end spacecraft is known for their sleek and sophisticated lines. Similarly, they have cultivated an exclusive customer base from the rich and the powerful. As ORIGIN’s perfectly-manicured salesmen eagerly point out, selecting an ORIGIN design doesn’t just mean buying a ship … it means choosing a lifestyle.

ORIGIN was incorporated during the so-called Glowing Age, the financial boom of the mid-28th century that followed the antimatter rush. For their first decade, the company produced high quality fusion engines used by the UEE military and mounted on the ostentatious Roberts Space Industries and Aegis Dynamics star yachts available to the public at the time. With the need for personal spacecraft growing exponentially, ORIGIN moved to compete with the companies they initially supplied.

Within ten years, the company was producing a top-five selling midscale composite transport and within fifty their well-paying customer base was neck and neck with RSI for gross profits in the manufactured spacecraft field. ORIGIN premiered their initial 200 and 300 lines of personal ships in 2899 and has held a strong second in that market ever since.

Founded on the banks of the Rhine in Cologne, Germany, ORIGIN had strong ties to Earth for the first two centuries of their existence, originally going so far as to insist that every component for their elite 600 line be manufactured in-Sol. In recent years, these ties have been severed completely. Declaring Terra the new cultural capital of the UEE, President Jennifer Friskers made the then-unpopular decision to relocate to Terra. In a largely unexpected executive order, she moved corporate headquarters and the primary design team to the settlement of New Austin in 2913.

End Quote

 

An abbreviated profile of the Terra system, home to Origin Jumpworks

Terra is the only system in the Empire that is named after the capital planet, rather than the star at its center, Terra Nova. Since its discovery, Terra has grown consistently in popularity and influence.

During the Messer era, Terra was one of the few systems that tried to maintain a progressive stance against the despotic reign. And it was this perseverance in the face of adversity, that elevated the system’s reputation and influence.  

Terra is often compared to Earth, as a seat of power and trendsetter. Many would like nothing more than to see Terra usurp Earth’s rung on the political ladder.

Also of note, Terra is one of only 9 stars systems that contain multiple asteroid belts. Its massive stone ruins on Terra III, New Austin’s Origin Jumpworks headquarters, and the sprawling Terra Prima bayside mega city are huge tourist attractions.  And Terra possesses Jump Point tunnels to Hadrian, Stanton, Tayac, Goss, Magnus, Pyro, and Taranis, making it rather well connected you might say.  On to the ship itself, the Origin 890 Jump.

 

Directly From CIG

UNLIMITED HORIZONS AWAIT…

The best sunset is the one you haven’t seen yet. The best noodles are worth traveling light years for. The secret to happiness is whispered inside every jump point. Once you know this about life amongst the stars, you’ll never settle for less than the best means to enjoy it. Fortunately, thanks to the 890 Jump, you’ll never have to …

With an elegant, sleek exterior that belies its spacious interior, the 890 Jump is a true engineering marvel; crafted to impress from every angle by combining a unique, innovative design with the finest materials and the most advanced technology. The result is a vessel that is in a class all of its own, a masterpiece worthy of the name ORIGIN.

This pre-order brochure will give you a glimpse of not only the most luxurious liner ever built, but of the universe it will allow you to explore.

Reserve your 890 Jump today and secure your exclusive chance to experience the galaxy in a remarkable new way.

Jennifer Friskers, President and CEO – ORIGIN Jumpworks

End Quote

 

The 890J first caught my attention when I was looking for a ship as a backdrop for a roleplaying scenario. A ship that, similar to why I pledged for the Starliner Genesis, could be used as a family and friends business in the persistent universe, as well as serve as a remote base of operations.  Travel, explore and see the universe in style, while providing revenue are the dream. And since I’m a firm believer that if you’re going to dream, it might as well be big, my heart landed on the 890J.

 

From CIG…

COME ABOARD

More room to entertain. More space for socializing. More areas for comfortable living. The 890 Jump is proof that sometimes more is definitely the right amount. This is the ideal vessel for both parties and privacy.  Take your pick of gathering spaces — enjoy magnificent views from the Captain’s Bridge or stretch out in the salon. Or take time out — retreat to your spacious stateroom or find a cozy nook to view the stars in quiet solitude.  Maybe you want to stretch your legs — with an accessible landing bay capable of housing a small ship or shuttle, you don’t have to keep the party aboard the 890 Jump.

End Quote

Unfortunately, the 890J isn’t regularly available for pledging. In fact, I had to wait almost a full year after deciding I wanted one, until an opportunity to pledge for it presented itself. By then I’d hit my self-appointed ceiling on ship pledges and had to make very tough choices. What was I willing to give up in my existing fleet in order to have the 890 J?

First into the melting pot were duplicate ships originally included in my fleet as loaners for friends. We’d just have to earn those in the game.  Next, I melted ships that had similar roles taking me down to a single combat ship, single small cargo ship, etc. Last I relinquished ships related to careers I wanted to test and write about but not a participant in long term. I’d have to beg, borrow or steal those to cover them. All in all, seven ships were melted in hopes of snagging the 890J.

 

From CIG…

CAPTAIN’S BRIDGE

One of the best parts of being the captain is that you’re always privy to the best views. Bask in the ever-changing cosmic vista with the wrap-around bridge rotunda, offering unparalleled visibility for a vantage point that’s simply unmatched.

Built for maximum comfort, the bridge offers three exquisitely crafted operator seats from Atlas, featuring ORIGIN’s award-winning suspension technology that cradles you for the smoothest flight of your life. Whether you’re at the helm or just enjoying the ride, the 890 Jump proves that the journey is just as important as the destination.

End Quote

 

The morning of the November 2016 Anniversary Sale, I was anxious and primed to refresh my browser, waiting for the sale to go live. I’d melted my ships in advance of the sale, not even knowing if the 890J would even be made available for pledging. My thinking was to ensure that if it was, I was in a position to instantly snap one up. It went on sale, I got one and all was right in my Star Citizen world.

 

From CIG…

TAKE A BREAK

A special place to retreat from the world, each VIP stateroom beckons with unparalleled comfort. The island berth features an oversize imperial gelcore mattress along with two berth end tables. Constructed from a specially selected stock of galung wood, known for its natural luster, harmony radiates from this comfortable haven. Sweet dreams and soothing surroundings await all who tarry here.  The 890 J comes with a personal away ship, the 85X Run-About.

Elegantly styled and meticulously constructed, the 85X is a versatile and comprehensive away-vessel that features precision control in and out of the atmosphere. Utilizing much of the same thruster technology as the 300 series, it has the power of a racer with the reliability of a touring ship. Whether descending down to the planet surface or taking in the sights of your system, this runabout continues Origin’s proud tradition of turning heads.

End Quote

As I mentioned earlier, I have plans to use the 890J as a luxury touring enterprise that I can run with family and friends who will be playing. Part of our amenities will be the opportunity to participate in RP events such as onboard Murder Mystery parties, something we’ve hosted on several occasions in real life.

HIGHLIGHTS PULLED FROM THE 890 JUMP Q&A

  • Classified as Luxury Touring, originally planned to be 123 meters in length with 5 crew stations. However, as we’ve seen other ships grow in size during the actual development process, I won’t be surprised if the 890 gets bigger along the way.
  • The ship’s hangar is large enough to fit two 85X size ships.
  • The empty space behind the cargo loader is the cargo hold, planned for 360 units of cargo space which is more cargo space than the Constellation variants but less than the stock Caterpillar. However, additional cargo capacity can be obtained by storing items on the loader itself
  • In general, the 890 should have more cargo space than the Constellation Taurus, but less than a similarly sized cargo ship.
  • The central elevator does actually reach to the top floor
  • Each guestroom is equipped with a private bathroom
  • The kitchen is for the whole ship, but there’s a separate dining area for passengers.
  • The cargo hold is not shielded as part of the stock loadout but that featured can be added by owners via an upgrade

If you’re looking for 890 Jump eye candy to tide you over, Taurus from the RSI Forums and Discord, has done amazing work. You’ve seen some it sprinkled throughout the show. I’ll include a link to his official forum thread in the show notes.

That wraps up our quick review of the Origin 890 Jump. I hope you’ve enjoyed this episode.  If you have, please considering subscribing to my channel and giving this episode a thumbs up.  Also, consider using my referral code if you haven’t created an account on Robertsspaceindustries.com.  Doing so will give you 5K in game credits when the game goes live and grants me some in-game goodies.

 

HOW TO SUPPORT THE SHOW AND WEBSITE

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Show Links


Preparing for Alpha 3.0 - Flight Ready Cargo Ships

I have Star Citizen Alpha 3.0 on my mind. I’m so pumped to start seeing the non-combat professions integrated into the persistent universe. Casual Citizen episode 25 discusses the flight-ready cargo ships we’ll have at our disposal to test out the first implementation of cargo hauling. Check it out on YouTube or SoundCloud to be sure you’re ready to hit the ground running.

SHOW NOTES

Flight Ready Cargo Ships

Hull B Q&A Post with updated Cargo Sizes

SHOW TRANSCRIPT

BEGIN TRANSMISSION.

WHAT’S IN AND WHAT’S OUT

Originally, I was going to limit the conversation to the ships CIG has flagged as “cargo ship” on RobertsSpaceIndustries.com. However, two popular ships are missing if I did that – the Cutlass Black and Constellation Andromeda, which I’ve decided to  include. Whereas I haven’t included the Mustang Alpha because it requires the optional cargo carrier which has yet to materialize in game.

REAL CARGO SIZES PLEASE STAND UP

Unfortunately, there are conflicts between the cargo capacity for the ships listed in the actual ship stats versus updated sizes that were published as part of the MISC Hull B Q&A. This is rather unfortunate, since the average player isn’t likely to see the updated cargo size information.  With the exception of the Argo Cargo and the Starfarer Gemini, which weren’t on the updated list, I’m going to reference the sizes from the Hull B Q&A post, which I will link in the show notes.

For the Argo Cargo I pulled the value from the brochure. For the Gemini, I used the updated size for the refueling variant but applied the reduced capacity percentage witnessed on the their respective technical overview pages.  

Directly from RSI Cargo Chart

Cubic meters? Freight Units? Standard Cargo Units?! We’ve gone through several iterations for measuring cargo, to the point that our own design team has confused the two on occasion. Today, we’re setting the record straight with a ‘master’ list. Dan Tracy has measured every ship currently ‘in-engine’ and made estimates for others (such as the Merchantman) which are not. As of today, this is the definitive list of cargo capacity and these numbers will be applied to the stats page. Please pay special intent to the comparative sizes rather than simply the number; these are the best indicator of where these ships are intended to fall on the spectrum, regardless of the units of measurement we use.

The inability to get most accurate or updated cargo information more easily, is a bit unfortunate for this particular class of ship.  There’s updated information available it’s just not where people would be looking for it.

Now that understanding where and how I obtained the cargo sizes you’ll hear me reference, is out of the way, let’s begin. I’ll be discussing the ships in order of available cargo capacity – smallest to largest. To reiterate, these are FLIGHT READY cargo ships.

WHY CARGO HAULING?

Let’s begin by defining cargo hauling as I suspect there will be varying definitions.  Establishing mine is important for data I’ll share in a bit and what’s available on Alysianahsworld.com.  

I differentiate between trade and cargo hauling. For me, cargo hauling is picking up goods in one place and delivering them to another. You have no ownership of the items being transported. You don’t know or care what they cost to acquire. You’re not involved in selling them. You’re merely the bus driver.

Merchants and traders care about the cost to purchase goods versus the resale value. Traders and merchants earn revenue from selling of goods.  Cargo haulers are paid to transport goods.  I think cargo hauling will be a good active profession for players of a certain play style and an excellent passive profession for most everyone. I personally, only plan to do cargo hauling as a secondary, passive mode of generating income.  If I’m going that way and have the space available on my ship, by all means I’ll deliver those goods for ya.

MONEY MAKES MMOS GO ‘ROUND.

The persistent universe side of Star Citizen will contain many of the common trapping of any MMO. Specifically, you’ll need a way to earn in-game currency to support yourself. In this case, support fueling, arming, repairing and possibly upgrading your ship.  You may want to do the same for your character, such as obtain better armor and weapons. You’ll have insurance premiums to pay. You’ll have hangar fees to pay. Money. Money. Money. For most players, your existence in the Star Citizen universe will require you to earn a living in game.

For those who don’t want to focus on combat as a means of earning currency. Or who aren’t particularly interested in having PVE missions dictate their actions, cargo hauling is a viable incoming generating profession. You can obtain work via contracts that will be available on the Trade and Development Division job boards. You can accept cargo transport specific missions. You can shuttle cargo for other players.  All of this while seeing the world. Cargo hauling is also one of the player professions that can more easily be done solo, if that’s your preference.

CARGO SHIPS AVAILABLE IN ALPHA 3.0

Alpha 3.0 is going to give us our first taste of cargo hauling. I suspect we’ll see cargo missions from NPCs. I anticipate being able to pick up work at the Trade and Development Division locations, such as Job Well in ArcCorp Area 18.  The physical implementation in game is likely to contain placeholder activity for loading and unloading cargo. Similar to the placeholder implementation for ship repairs in we’re using for Cry-Astro. In other words, there’ll be some handwavium going on.

Bringing cargo hauling online will also innately bring with it opportunities for other player professions and play styles such as piracy and mercs. You need to keep these these things in mind if you’re going to pursue moving merchandise. Space and be a dangerous and unforgiving place. Common sense and situational awareness will be important. I’m crossing my fingers that ship security comes online with  cargo otherwise, lots of unnecessary tomfoolery will take place on landing pads that will be 100% outside of a pilot’s ability to control.

If you want to take part in the early alpha testing of cargo hauling, let’s take a look at ships that are flight ready and have cargo space available.

ARGO CARGO

From CIG…

The ARGO Astronautics MPUV-1C (commonly ‘Argo Cargo’) is a dedicated merchant transfer ship, a ubiquitous intergalactic stevedore. Vast numbers of Argo Cargos are responsible for loading and unloading goods onto massive long-haul transports and miners that cannot otherwise land on planets or drydocks, such as the Hull D and the Orion. Some captains choose to own and operate their own Argo, while others pay privately owned ships operating as port services a rental fee for performing the unloading process.

I don’t see the Argo Cargo as a ship that makes sense for cargo hauling in Alpha 3.0. Lacking a quantum drive and only possessing 6 SCUs of space, it’s the least ideal option for participating in cargo hauling in 3.0.  We don’t have any flyable ships that are too large to land in order to deliver cargo themselves.  Unless you have no other option and simply want to try the mechanics, to me this one is a non-starter.

Avenger Titan

From CIG…

Lacking the Prisoner Cells of the Stalker or the EMP Generator of the Warlock, the Titan’s hold is free to carry cargo. Couple that available space with the Avenger’s tried and true combat abilities and you’ve got a light cargo hauler that’s more than capable of handling itself in a fight. *This is the standard Avenger chassis with the Titan Cargo Module pre-installed.*

Titan is the standard Stalker chassis with the prison cells swapped for cargo space. I like this as an option for people who want to do a small amount of cargo hauling and combat. The Avenger holds its own nicely in combat and was for a time, my preferred combat ship. I think it’s speed and maneuverability also make it less of a target piracy. Because it has non-cargo variants, it’s appearance in the skies also doesn’t scream, “I’m carrying cargo here!”. I am however very surprised at the Titan’s 12 SCUs of cargo space. There’s probably an update to that number not readily available. I can’t see how swapping out 3 prisoner cells nets so little space. However, all elements combined, I think it’s a reasonable choice for play-testing cargo hauling during alpha or as an interim short-lived first solution in the live game.

Aurora CL

From CIG…

Customized for mercantile and trading excursions, the Aurora Clipper is the perfect vessel for aspiring entrepreneurs and seasoned traders alike. Swapping a smaller power plant and armor capabilities for an expanded cargo capacity, the Clipper ups the ante for personal merchant craft.

We’ll probably see many Auroras taking part in cargo hauling. We know from CIG that this is one of the more popular ship packages, hence more people have Auroras than any other ship. The CL variant in particular is very good in terms of ship cost versus cargo capacity, coming in at 23 SCUs. Auroras are also very durable for a starter ship making them good for cargo transport using an avoid combat at all costs strategy. You simply have to survive until you reach your drop off location.

Reliant Kore

From CIG…

With the Reliant Kore, MISC adds to its already impressive lineup of ships, a smaller introductory-class spacecraft. Utilizing advanced Xi’An designs, the Reliant features broad, sleek wings, omni-directional thrusters and a fully-articulated two-seat cockpit that supports horizontal and vertical flight modes. All of this combines with a larger carrying capacity than many ships in its class to make the Kore a natural choice for short-range hauling, or with the simple addition of a few optional components, this can-do ship can do anything you dream of.

I have mixed feelings about the Reliant Kore for cargo transport in its current implementation. Purely from an investment perspective, comparing the cost of the ship versus its cargo hauling space, it does well. It’s a $65 USD ship with 30 SCUs. However, we’ve yet to see the speed boost it’s supposed to have when in its vertical flight mode. It lacks versatility of being viable as a combat ship without swapping to the Tana configuration which isn’t doable yet. And it’s more suited to short-hop jobs because there’s no bed aboard the Reliants.  Beds are a feature that will allow you to safely log out of the game in space, save that location and return to it the next time you log in versus spawning at the nearest space station.  For Alpha game play, I’ve kept my Kore to test out cargo hauling. However, it will not be a permanent ship in my fleet. And I have access to a Cutlass Black, by way of having purchased a Cutlass Red.

Cutlass Black

From CIG…

Drake Interplanetary claims that the Cutlass Black is a low-cost, easy-to-maintain solution for local in-system militia units. The larger-than-average cargo hold, RIO seat and dedicated tractor mount are, the company literature insists, for facilitating search and rescue operations.

For passive cargo hauling, I think the Cutlass Black is a real contender for bang for your buck. It’s a versatile ship that supports multi-crew activities and has 33 SCUs for cargo hauling. Whether that 33 SCUs is filled up by your own legit cargo or what you’ve pilfered from others, that’s up to you. Surprisingly the Cutlass comes with a size 4 shield, the second largest among the flight ready ships. This makes it another ship that’s viable for solo cargo hauling with the intention of outrunning and out surviving anyone who gives chase. However, like the Reliant Kore there are no beds on-board so I wouldn’t pick the Cutlass Black if you have long term cargo hauling aspirations.  That said, I expect to see many players using it to haul cargo in Alpha 3.0. And when you see one, you won’t know if it’s carrying cargo or coming to get yours, making it a nice is it cat or mouse deterrent.

Freelancer Mercantile

From CIG…

Freelancers are used as long haul merchant ships by major corporations, but they are just as frequently repurposed as dedicated exploration vessels by independent captains who want to operate on the fringes of the galaxy.

Here’s where I think we cross the line into ships that are better served as multi-crew even if cargo hauling. We’re getting to slower moving ships that are less maneuverable, leaving you open to being swarmed if you can’t get away. And knowing that the other features these ships were designed to take advantage of aren’t in the game yet, many will bet you’re carrying cargo. So if you are, be prepared to defend yourself.

The Freelancer variant that is flyable is designed for moving cargo. It has a nice bump in capacity from the Kore, coming in at 52 SCUs. It’s also a very defensible ship with a good pilot and someone in the turret. It has sleeping berths making it a good fit for longer duration shipping if that’s something you’re going to pursue in the live game. If you’re considering the Freelancer as a long term cargo option, you might want to take a look at the Freelancer MAX which has twice the cargo capacity.

Constellation Andromeda

From CIG…

The Constellation Andromeda, a multi-person freighter, is the most popular ship in RSI’s current production array. Constellations are beloved by smugglers and merchants alike because they are modular, high powered… and just downright iconic-looking.  134 cargo units. Taurus – transport variant has 243

The Constellation Andromeda makes the list because it has 134 SCUs of cargo space and is flyable. Strictly speaking this is the more militarized variant. The Taurus is the transport variant but isn’t flight ready. I doubt I’d attempt doing cargo hauling solo in a Connie. You will be a target and a ship of this size is better served having its turrets manned and bodies available to repel boarding attempts if it comes down to that. Even having escorts might be advisable once you start moving cargo in a ship of this size.

Unlike how the PU combat happens now, there will be more incentive to go after larger ships that may be carrying cargo, especially, if some of the cargo survives when the ship is destroyed.  Now it’s a matter of who can I kill before they kill me, if I want to engage at all.  For many players, there’s little to no incentive of picking a fight with the larger ships. All you get in return is a repair and rearming bill. Come 3.0, that same fight now nets you a chance at profits.  Different ball game that requires a a higher level of situational awareness.

Starfarer

From CIG…

The Starfarer differs from traditional bulk freighters in one key way: it is a dedicated fuel platform. The Starfarer is designed not only to load, store and protect fuel stasis units, it is designed to take in spaceborne hydrogen and then refine it for use without landing. The Starfarer can be used to ferry traditional bulk cargo pods (see diagram) but in such cases the fuel refining equipment would be useless. This equipment is modular and can be swapped out for another mission package for dry operations!

The United Empire of Earth military uses an adapted ‘rough and tumble’ variant of the Starfarer for their front line operations. The G2M Gemini, more commonly the Starfarer Gemini or ‘Star G,’ trades some cargo capacity and maneuverability in exchange for reinforced armor, increased shielding, more powerful engines and stronger versions of the three manned turrets. The Gemini also includes an optional missile pod, which can be swapped for the fuel intake unit on the ship’s nose (see below for details.) Missile pods can be mounted to either Starfarer variant.

Now we’ve hit the largest ships in the alpha play-test by a considerable amount. Similarly, they have the largest cargo payloads. The Starfarer refueling variant, which is considered the transport variant haxe 4,044 SCUs.  With the Gemini coming in at an estimated 3033 SCUs. Remember that the number I’m using for the gemini is based on the updated transport variant’s SCUs that were provided in the Hull B Q&A.

I think running cargo in either of these ships, assuming you can get one to spawn, will be very exciting for those involved. Massive shenanigans in coming of people trying to seize or destroy them for the cargo. I think most when carrying cargo will be properly manned and have escorts.  This has the potential to broaden the combat fields seen in the PU to multiple locations – anywhere one of these is in transit. Versus what we see now which is mostly in and around Kareah or Grim Hex.

As long term cargo hauling vessels, I think there are better options unless transporting fuel or other liquid goods the Starfarer will be configurable for in the future. As a pure hauler, I’d be looking into the Hull series.  But in the meantime, these will have the largest payload for many months. The first Hull series ship, the Hull C, isn’t due until Alpha 3.1 which I think is likely spring 2017.

ACCORDING TO THE LORE

Knowing where to look for cargo hauling work will be simple in Alpha 3.0. You’re picking it up in Stanton and delivering it to somewhere else in Stanton. You won’t have to do much research on your own to know where to go.  You won’t need to really evaluate if the cost of fuel and crew is worth the trip. It won’t be that easy as more star systems come online and more players engage in the alpha.  Things will be more competitive and some level of logistics planning and consideration will be required to remain profitable.

Helping with logistics planning is the primary goal of Alysianahsworld. It’s aim is to provide you with the information necessary to help you make more knowledgeable decisions when it comes to investing time, effort and money into player professions.  It helps you identify where to look for work, tells you about that area and lets you refine the list of where to work based on other personal preferences such as:

  • How dangerous is that star system on average?
  • Are the other opportunities I can take advantage of while there that makes picking this location better for me than another?
  • Can I string together a multi-hop route to maximize my net profit?

It’s likely that most star systems will have some availability of cargo hauling opportunities via NPC specific missions and the Trade Development Division. However, showing up and hoping that the available jobs fit the capabilities of your ship might not be the most cost effective option.  

The ARK Starmap and the Galactic Guides, both subject to change, reflect the world that’s being built and both contain information about player professions.  Alysianahsworld.com ties these two assets together by mapping the lore from the guides to the physical univers of the ARK Starmap, into what I call Dossiers.  Where each Dossier is tying together the locations and lore related to a specific profession.

For example, if you have a small cargo hauling ship and are just starting out, what are some of the best places for you to find steady work? Perhaps you’re on the other end of the scale. You’d rather do less frequent longer duration jobs. Where are you going to start looking for that kind of work?  Looking through the Starmap and Galactic Guides you can find the answers for both of those scenarios if you want to spend hours upon hours pouring through it all.  But you don’t have to.

Checking out my Cargo and Trade Dossier page will list all Star Systems where explicit lore information has been provided about job opportunities. This information will be updated regularly and continue to grow as I slowly make my way through all of the available CIG content, AND am able to include information from the actual systems themselves when they are introduced.

On the Trade and Cargo Dossier you can view locations that contain:

  • Explicit lore related to cargo hauling contracts
  • Mentions of job opportunities for specific types of cargo hauling – short hop vs. long duration
  • Review potential volume of work for cargo hauling
  • Review import and export activity in those same systems which can represent opportunistic trading such as picking up a rare item you can sell elsewhere for a profit.
  • Review Black Market and Piracy in those areas if you’re inclined to participate in those activities
  • Learn about the star systems where these opportunities exist and filter them based on your preferences of population, economy and danger thresholds or government alignments.

Simple. Straight forward. And a means to make more informed routing options when planning cargo runs. Check it out. I hope you find it useful.

That’s it for this episode of Casual Citizen. You can find links to all the ships discussed in the show notes. Also checkout Alysianahsworld.com to see the growing compendium of information to assist players with logistics planning.  If you’ve enjoyed this episode please consider subscribing to my channel and giving the show a thumbs up.

This is Alysianah signing out until next time. Be kind and fly safe.

END TRANSMISSION


How to Export Your Custom Keybindings

To say that Star Citizen has a lot of keybindings is in understatement. On top of which, the default settings might not feel intuitive for your personal tastes. Good news is that we can customize the settings to our liking for the keyboard, mouse, gamepad and joystick.

To Access Keybindings:

  • Press [Esc] to access the Main Menu
  • Choose Options
  • On the Options Menu choose Keybindings
  • Click [Advanced  Controls Customizations]

If you do customize the settings, it’s essential for your mental health that you make use of the export feature to save a copy of your configuration to an external file. You should also copy the XML file that is created, to a location outside of the Star Citizen game folders.  This will allow you to copy it back into the appropriate location after a new patch, which suggests deleting the USER folder, which would in turn delete your custom keybindings.

The other reason I recommend exporting/saving your custom keybindings, is that it allows you to experiment with variations. Using sensible naming conventions, you can try different settings until you find the one that works best for you, without having to muck with the keybindings back and forth.

I use very specific keybindings for character movement. I personally find that the QWERTY keys suit me better than WASD + modifiers to strafe and/or turn. As the behavior of features have changed, I’ve had to re-prioritize which actions are buttons on my HOTAS. Having different versions of keybindings I can test and retrieve at will, has been extremely useful.

With the continued refinement of the default keybindings, I’ve reverted to only changing the keybindings that are must haves for me. Things I can’t function without being set to my liking. Being able to import these back in after a patch is a huge time saver and a feature that all players should be aware exists. Here’s a link to the image in the video you can keep as a reminder of the steps.


Proactive Shield Management

Oftentimes, the time-to-kill in ship combat can feel fast in Star Citizen. I’m not worried. I’ve experienced faster and slower.  Plus we know that combat mechanics are still evolving, with adjustments coming down the pike. However, there’s something that we should all be doing now, that I rarely see pilots doing when watching their videos. It’s relatively easy and can mean the difference in surviving an encounter. I’m talking about shield management.

In the video below  you can see me adjusting shields as necessary.  Keep an eye on the left side of my cockpit. The shield management window will appear very quickly when adjustments are being made. If I’m flying head on into a cluster of enemy ships, I increase the strength of the front shield.  If I’m being sniped in the back while taking on foes in the front, I increase my rear shield and so on.

To learn about proactive and reactive shield management check out my article on REDACTED.


What is Star Citizen?

Crowdfunded Phenomenon

Star Citizen is many things, some of which are different to different people. The game itself is the brainchild of veteran game developer Chris Roberts, who is most widely known for his Wing Commander game series and the movie. Under the banner of Cloud Imperium Games, he’s now developing his dream space sim and first person universe, Star Citizen. The development costs are being covered using a crowdfunding model and to date, Star Citizen has raised a record breaking 115 million dollars and counting. What is so compelling about the planned content for Star Citizen that people are willing to crowdfund it to such an unprecedented amount?

Show Transcript

Star Citizen – Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game

Let’s begin with a quote from the official game site for star Citizen, RobertsSpaceIndustries.com…

From the mind of Chris Roberts, acclaimed creator of Wing Commander and Freelancer, comes STAR CITIZEN. 100% crowd funded, Star Citizen aims to create a living, breathing science fiction universe with unparalleled immersion… and you’re invited to follow every step of development!

More than a space combat sim, more than a first person shooter and more than an MMO: Star Citizen is the First Person Universe that will allow for unlimited game-play.

Based on that blurb you come away with an understanding that Star Citizen has a massively multiplayer persistent universe that contains space combat, first person shooter combat and open-ended game play mechanics, where the player decides what role to assume and how they will interact with others and world around them. The latter is often referred to as sandbox. However, in addition to the “make your own fun” of a sandbox game, there will also be a robust questing system, trade professions and a dynamic and responsive in-game economy. That alone is a whole lot of game! But there’s more.

Because that’s not enough to wrap your mind around, Star Citizen is also incorporating never before seen game mechanics such as multi-crew ships, a completely seamless universe from deep space down to planet side landing zones, high definition streaming tech of procedurally generated planets and space combat using Newtonian physics.  If I had to put Star Citizen into the narrow context of other games you may know it’s like combining bits of EVE Online + Destiny + basic MMO tropes. Okay, hold on to all that, cuz that’s Star Citizen and only one of the games being developed.

Squadron 42 – Single Player Role Playing Game

In parallel, Cloud Imperium games is also building Squadron 42 using the same funding and resource pool. At its core, Squadron 42 is a triple A RPG campaign that takes place in the same universe and lore as Star Citizen. It’s a hero’s journey look at the world where the storyline is all about YOU – your decisions and actions, and this version of YOU, has an impact on your character in the Star Citizen persistent universe. Think single player campaign of Halo with top casting talent such as Mark Hamill, Gary Oldman and Gillian Anderson, using next-gen animation technology. Squadron 42 is being designed as episodic journey, where the first set of episodes is scheduled to release in 2016.

Two Games – Three Ways to Buy

These two games combined – Star Citizen and Squadron 42 are what Could Imperium Games is working to develop and deliver, using their record-breaking crowd funding campaign that began in 2012. So when someone speaks of Star Citizen, oftentimes they are lumping both games into that conversation. However, for accuracy’s sake Star Citizen is just the MMO and you can purchase a game package for just those features here. Squadron 42 is the RPG and is also available for purchase separately here. Or you can purchase a combination package that include Star Citizen and Squadron 42 at a discounted price with the Aurora MR or the Mustang Alpha.

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How to Join the Star Citizen Alpha

This Game is in Development!

Let’s begin by reiterating that Star Citizen is FAR from a completed game!  Star Citizen is using an open development process that allows supporters to play test content as it becomes available.  Players who choose to participate in this process can provide CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK that contributes to improving the breadth of testing that’s possible and in some cases, refine how mechanics are implemented.  

We Are Not Stockholders. We Are Not Shareholders.

We have contributed funds to the development of Star Citizen.  However, we are not shareholders or part of the Cloud Imperium Games development staff.  Whether or not to utilize feedback being provided is ultimately up to them and their collective vision for the game as a whole.  The reasons behind some of their decisions may not initially be apparent to us, as we’re only seeing tiny slices of mechanics at a time.  

As of this article’s publication date, the only way to have permanent access to play-test Star Citizen content is by purchasing a GAME PACKAGE.  Game packages currently include a ship, alpha and beta PLAYTEST access to Star Citizen, a ship hangar and other digital assets depending on the package.

The variance in package prices reflect the ship or ships being included in the pledge you’re contributing toward development.  Remember that ships being purchased now can be acquired in-game without using real life cash once the game releases.  The primary reason to pledge/purchase now is to fund the development of the game.  If you’re not into play-testing alpha quality content or early access games, this scenario isn’t for you.  Stop now – beyond here be dragons. It’s better for you to wait for the beta or released game than becoming disgruntled, upset and foaming at the mouth over alpha quality content.

Conquering RobertsSpaceIndustries .com

Choosing the Fly Now option is the easiest and lowest costing method of obtaining a game package that is regularly available. Fly Now presents you with two $45 USD options for backing Star Citizen. This option is available here.

  1. The Aurora MR which is actually one of three ships in the Aurora line.  The MR is the middle of the road choice between a combat focused ship and low price point ship with cargo capacity.
  2. The other option is the Mustang Alpha. A fast ship often used for racing.  The Mustang can also stand up to combat.  But it wouldn’t be my first choice as a dedicated combat ship.

Other Game Packages

Don’t blackout from sticker shock when you see the price tag on some of the other Game Packages.  These are for people who want to contribute that much to the game’s development in exchange for the contents of those packages. Here’s a link to the packages page on the RSI website.

 I suggest that until you know more about what you want to do in Star Citizen, you stick to the ships in the $45 to $100 USD range.  If you want to contribute more at a later date, by way of acquiring a large ship, you can upgrade your existing ship using the Cross Chassis Upgrade system located here.  

All you need to know now is that you will get 100% purchase price CREDIT on any ship you buy.  You can in turn use the credit to upgrade to different ship in the future.  This means you have nothing to lose by starting small until you know more about the game and whether or not it’s really going to float your boat.

Hangar Ready vs. Flight Ready vs. Concept Ship

In case you couldn’t help surfing beyond the Fly Now options, let’s discuss things you might consider  even as a casual citizen.  Unfortunately is rather easy to become confusing about what you’re purchasing if you free roam  the “All Game Packages” section of RSI.  Let’s discuss what’s there at a high level but don’t you dare take a gander at “All Ships” yet!  You must learn to walk first little duck. You are not prepared for what lurks under “All Ships”.

The “All Game Packages” section contains all packages that are purchasable as pledges to fund Star Citizen.  However, not all the ships are ready for play testing. And this is what trips some people up when trying to pledge.

Flight Ready

Ships are view-able in your hangar AND are available for play-testing.  This doesn’t necessarily mean that they’re 100% in their final release state.  Remember THIS IS ALPHA.  Things can and will continue to change.  However, enough of the design and technical implementation have been defined and developed, that these ships are ready to be used on a regular basis. Say this with me…Flight ready ship means I can use it now.

Hangar Ready

A second category of ship are those that are only “hangar ready”.  “Hangar ready” ships are can be placed in your hangar but ARE NOT ready for play-testing. The development pipeline classification allows you to see your new toy inside your hangar.  You can go inside the ship’s cockpit and/or interior to see a preview of the design intent.  Note that these ships often contain placeholder elements so don’t become concerned if an interior element doesn’t look as high fidelity as something else you’ve seen.  This isn’t a finished ship.

When you own a ship that is only “Hangar Ready” you will have a loaner ship available to fly but that loaner won’t be sitting in your hanger.  However, when you go to join any module that contains flight options the name of a ship you don’t actually own will be in the list for you.  That’s your loaner and you’ll have access to it until your ship is “Flight Ready”. In summary, Hangar Ready means you can see it in your hangar and walk around inside of it but it’s not flyable and even its visual aspects may contain placeholder elements.

Concept Ship

Another classification of ship that is frequently discussed, so you should  be aware of is a  “Concept Ship”. For all intents and purposes, these ships are still at the “on paper” stage.  The ship’s intent is known but it’s VERY early in the design process.  A good amount of players do pledge for concept ships because of their special roles, which are usually tied to specific professions. If you know for sure that you’re interested in something like mining for example, and want to start out with a mining ship, you could have purchased the Orion concept ship, which is the first dedicated mining ship introduced.  At concept means, there’s nothing to show you but pictures and possibly a design document discussing its planned implementation and in-game mechanics. Generally speaking, these ships are a long way from being made “Flight Ready”.

PLEASE make sure you know the at least the difference between Flight Ready, Hangar Ready and Concept Ship, if you’re going to move beyond the “Fly Now” page to make your first pledge.

Beyond the Fly Now Starter Package Ships

Here are the ships I recommend for casual followers just starting out. From the Fly Now page you have the Aurora MR or Mustang Alpha for $45 USD.  Go for the Aurora MR is you want more variety in capabilities in the Persistent Universe, as it has cargo space. If you’re a bit bolder step beyond Fly Now and have a look at ….

  • Different ship from the Aurora series that better suits your intentions
  • MISC Reliant series are classified as starter ships that have specialized capabilities for player professions. They also support two crew stations which is rare for that  price point. For more information on the Reliant check out the article I wrote here. Note as of this article they are concept ships and not always available for purchase.
  • Aegis Avenger is also an excellent starting ship.  It’s equipped for combat and contains holding cells if you want to do Bounty Hunting.  However, if you have a strong inkling that you may want to try hauling cargo, note that this variant has no cargo space available.  However, there will be modules available at a future date that allow you to customize this ship’s focus.  For now, if you want cargo space purchase the Titan variant, which swaps the holding cells for a cargo bay.


RSI Constellation Series

Roberts Space Industries (RSI)

Founded in 2075, Roberts Space Industries have pioneered space travel since the early 2100s when they invented the Zeus, humanities first ship capable of short-distance flight. These first attempts were limited to only the super wealthy, but it wasn’t long before they found a way to deliver space travel to the masses with their range of Aurora and Constellation spaceships.

The RSI Constellation

The Constellation series comes in (4) flavors and is designed to cater to a broad range of needs. The original base model is a multi-person freighter, the bestselling ship in the RSI line up.

The Constellation is often favored by merchants and smugglers, due to its cargo capacity, high-power output, and modularity. Options such as:

  • Enhanced cargo hold
  • Electromagnetic barriers to hide contraband
  • Internal bulkheads to allow for higher damage endurance
  • Avionic upgrades for better targeting, ship identification, and sensor range
  • Comes with snub nose fighter that is launched directly from the parent ship

Each Constellation model includes a manned turret, a sizable cargo area, and a flight deck. Recently four additional models were revealed which provide additional features.

The Andromeda – Gun Ship

The Andromeda base model holds a crew of 5 and comes with a P-52 Merlin in the hangar – a dedicated parasite fighter, designed for one crew member to hop in and join a dogfight with speed. This maneuverable little ship measures in at 12 meters in length making it ideal for racing, fast-paced combat and a bit of discretely localized reconnaissance. If destroyed in battle, the P-52 Merlin comes with a lifetime replacement insurance making it a reliable tool for any fleet concerned about risking resources.

The Andromeda can hold 134.4 Cargo Units, is 61.1 meters in length and holds a maximum of 6 power plants and shields, 4 engines, and 8   thrusters.

Aquila – Expedition

The Aquila is designed for exploration and comes with a redesigned cockpit allowing for extra visibility but only 4 crew members. This variant comes with the P-52 above, plus an Ursa Rover for planetside investigations.

Holding 4 passengers, the Ursa Rover allows teams to head out and explore, featuring two CF-117 Bulldog Laser Repeaters for protection, it also offers military-grade all-terrain capabilities making it perfect for scouting, mapping and discovering new features across the universe.

The Aquila can hold 134 cargo units, is 60.1 meters in length and holds a maximum of 6 power plants and shields, 4 engines and 8 maneuvering thrusters.

The Phoenix – Luxury Touring

The Phoenix is the luxury variant of the Constellation series, designed for 4 crew members. Featuring discrete cargo storage, an enhanced ‘Lynx’ Rover and a Kruger P-72 Archimedes fighter. This ship is designed for style, with a mini-bar, hot tub, meeting room and other high-end finishing touches. The cargo area features a hidden sensor-dampened area for fragile cargo.

For the major party animals, there is an advance Phoenix Emerald model that also includes a ‘Lucky’ paint finish and an upgraded ‘swank’ interior cabin intended for pure revelry.

The Taurus – Medium Freight

The heavy lifter of the Constellation family is the Taurus. A 4 crewmember, freight freight-focused that strips out the unnecessary aspects, and focuses purely on expanded cargo.

Perfect for soon to be wealthy merchants. This ship is for those looking to build and expand long-term, however, it sacrifices the snub racers, and ground buggies in favor for nearly 100 extra cargo units compared to the other Constellation ships.

The Taurus is slightly shorter in length than its counterparts but comes with an additional 5th shield slot, a maximum of 6 power plants, 4 engines, and 8 maneuvering thrusters.

With upgrades and amendments, the constellation series can be stretched to hold a maximum crew of up to ten people, with higher cargo capacities and many other features on hand to truly personalize your investment. All variations come with an RSI Jump Engine to allow Jump Point travel between star systems.

P-72 Archimedes – Snub Nose Fighter

The P-72 Archimedes is a perfect sidekick to the Constellation Phoenix. Although it is the same size, this is the flashy upmarket sister to the P-52 Merlin. The Archimedes is a luxury racer, boasting two ‘size three’ thrusters and 12 ‘size two’maneuvering thrusters to allow the Archimedes to push the laws of physics to their limit.

My Impressions

I owned the Constellation Aquila as part of my gaming package for quite some time during its original design. And while think the redesign was AMAZING and well worth the wait, in the end, it felt like a duplication of other ships in my fleet.

  • Price vs. size vs. features, the Connies are very competitive ships.
  • As an exploration ship, it didn’t provide the atmosphere I wanted.
  • The struts all over the cockpit view annoy me.
  • The HUD – well, I shed a tear for current owners everytime I see it. I’m sure it will get fixed but for now, it’s simply horrendous.
  • If you want that Star Trek feel then I can see wanting and enjoying the Connie.

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Anvil Carrack

Show Transcript

Anvil Aerospace

Anvil Aerospace was founded in 2772. To this day, it remains one of Terra’s success stories. The company’s focus has been on delivering military-grade equipment to the UEE navy. Anvil’s entry into the civilian market is relatively new. While there had been internal debate over the company making this move, the UEE weighed in favorably on the idea. The government thought outfitting civilians with military-styled capabilities was a prudent cautionary measure for solidifying our general defenses. Equipped with Anvil ships, these pilots could be called upon as local militia, especially in distant frontiers.

Many of us will undoubtedly explore the star systems that comprise the Star Citizen universe. Participating in player missions and pursuing careers will necessitate some travel. I can’t imagine anyone playing Star Citizen without some intention to explore. That said, they’re exploring in the vein of sightseeing and then there’s the career or more serious pursuit of exploration.

Anvil Carrack

To perform exploration as a career choice in Star Citizen, necessitates that at a minimum you can, navigate jump points, scan areas to identify space anomalies, categorize the information and accurately document your findings. Several ships will fit the bill of performing minimal exploration, like the Aurora ES. However, for more serious pursuit there are other modules and amenities that improve the overall experience for you and your crew. This is where a ship like the Anvil Carrack comes into play. It’s designed with sustained deep space exploration in mind. And includes features that support longer duration self sustained exploration excursions.

The Anvil Carrack is a multi-crew ship that supports 5 crew stations. Like several of the other ships manufactured by Anvil Aerospace, the Carrack was originally a military exclusive. Here are the features that set the Anvil apart as a dedicated exploration vessel

  • Specially reinforced fuel tanks for long-duration flight
  • Advanced jump drive capabilities provide by the Tarsus Tunneler
  • Dedicated computer core for jump charting operations.
  • Fully outfitted medical bay
  • Fully functional repair facilities
  • Mapping-oriented sensor suite
  • 1058 cargo units

As of this posting the Carrack is in the concept / early design phase. Backers who pledged to Star Citizen development via the Carrack are likely looking for the “Go where no man has gone before” experience. At a minimum, we know that exploration will include locating and charting new jump points, surveying and charting systems, detecting other space anomalies such as black holes, etc. Opportunities for this much is already evident in the ARK Starmap published by Cloud Imperium Games.  For more information on the system discoveries that await, please see my article about this subject here on Redacted.TV.

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Mining Profession

Show Transcript

As this will be one of the professions many new players gravitate toward, here’s a quick overview of the mining profession.  It was one of the first career design documents published and is supposedly representative of their philosophy for all careers.  Which is that career associated tasks contain activities that require skill, dext, rity and intelligence, where mindless repetition or idle monitoring are explicitly avoided.

This is after all, deep space and although a career isn’t combat oriented there’s danger present.  In the case of mining, the more valuable materials will reside in dense asteroid fields that must be piloted through without suffering serious damage to your ship.  While mining, you can encounter compressed pockets of gas and other volatile materials that can explode in the presence of excessive energy or detonate from seismic activity.  In other words, this isn’t an auto-pilot profession and careless players can die.

 IN THE BEGINNING

Visiting your local Trade and Development Division (TDD), which serves as the marketplace for commodities, can provide a sense of what’s in demand, at what price and where.  Once you’ve decided on what you want to attempt to mine, it’s time to decide between going freelance or acquiring a contract for those materials from a NPC run corporation.

There are benefits and risks of working freelance.  On the good, you are your own master.  You set your mining schedule and pace.  You may be able to sell your cargo for a higher than average price based on market changes.  However, the opposite is also a risk.  By the time you return with your cargo and list it for auction, the prices may have decreased.

If a committed payout is preferred, working on contract is the better option.  You know exactly how much you will be paid for your cargo.  However, this isn’t completely without risk.  If during the excursion your ship suffers damage OR unforeseen setbacks delay your return or reduce your cargo, your reputation will take a hit. In the end, you are paid less than you expected because of your performance and that performance has a lasting impact on future employment.

LOCATING THE RIGHT ASTEROID FIELDS

After deciding between freelance and contract, it’s time to locate asteroids that contain the materials you seek.  Every solar system will contain a variety of public information on major asteroid fields. It’s probably best to head into the known when you’re starting.  However, don’t expect to find the more lucrative materials there.  If they existed in that location, they’re likely long gone.  However, it’s still a good place to start mining common materials.

Freelancers wanting to maximize their profits can opt to spend money on an Information Broker.  This is someone who has knowledge about asteroid fields which aren’t public.  They either bought the information from someone else or obtained the coordinates through exploration and are using that information to provide a service.

Lastly, you can explore the galaxy yourself.  This will be the most time-consuming approach and not likely to be feasible for contract work that contains deadlines.  However, combined with an emphasis on exploration, a freelancer could turn an excellent profit by harvesting from isolated/unknown locations and/or selling the information to an Information Broker. You could also be an explorer and information broker yourself but we’re here to talk about mining. *Smile*

GETTING THE JOB DONE

Mining consists of multiple roles, and is done using a ship configured for mining, such as the Orion.  The more proficiency you have with performing a role the more efficient the results, which ultimately impacts effort versus profit.  Note that any or all of these roles can be performed by NPCs.  The NPC’s proficiency will be commensurate with their fee.

As for solo play as a miner, the design document leads me to believe that it’s not possible to mine completely solo – without players or NPCs. Roles that happen sequentially can be carried out by the same person.  However, there are activities that take place simultaneously and as such, require multiple bodies.

The pilot is responsible for safely navigating the ship to and within targeted asteroid fields.  This may not be as simple as it sounds.  Rarer materials will be located in dense fields which require nimble navigation skills to avoid costly ship damage.

A scan operator is responsible for identifying an asteroid’s composition.  This is accomplished by injecting remote material analysis packages (RMAPs) into nearby asteroids. The telemetry data is sent to the pilot and scan operator. Once a site is selected, the optimal injection orientation is displayed.  The scan operator launches and manually controls RMAP-equipped missiles used to impact the asteroid at the correct location to expose the materials you want to mine.  Actual mining efficiency is impacted by the accuracy of the scan operator’s efforts to expose the asteroid’s components.

Next up is the beam operator who is responsible for wielding the mining beam affixed to the ship’s robotic arms.  They have direct control over beam output and if they’re good, are able to precisely extract materials.  Their control of the beam is also critical to safety, as an injection of surplus energy into volatile materials can cause explosive chain reactions.  The result of such a mistake can range from ship damage to the loss of the ship and its crew.

The cargo operator is the sifting and pick-up role.  Mined materials are NOT automagically deposited into your vessel.  The cargo operator monitors the fragments being excavated by the mining beam and interrogates them using an integrated Fragment Scanner. Fragments of interest are directed into a ship’s input port.  The input port houses a crusher that pulverizes the fragments into rubble and stores the contents into cargo modules.  The skill of this person also impacts the value of your payload. They can miss important fragments or be so slow that they impact your efficiency, putting you behind schedule for contract deliveries.

If your ship is equipped with a refinery, the refinery operator will process raw ore into its purified forms, ejecting waste elements out into space.  Purified materials consume considerably less storage space which allows your operation to continue for extended periods of time before it becomes necessary to dock and unload.

Whew, that’s more involved than the mining I’ve done in other games such as EVE Online. I have no intention of mining in Star Citizen.  Even in this interactive model, there are other things I’d rather do to earn a living.  However, I’m sure this is going to appeal to a lot of people which is why I wanted to provide a short overview of the mechanics involved. Here’s a link to the design document for a more detailed look at the profession.

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